Find Real Estate Agents and Homes for Sale


Real Estate News --> South Carolina News

South Carolina Democrat Kicks Off Second Congressional Bid With Self-Deprecating Video


Less than four months after narrowly losing a special election to represent South Carolina’s 5th Congressional District ... Norman is a 64-year-old real estate developer and former state lawmaker who ran as a hard-line conservative.


Archived Story

CBCMenu SearchQuick LinksNewsSportsRadioListen LiveTVWatchClose MenuCBC.ca HOME Discover CBCComedyArtsMusicBooksDocsLifeParentsKidsJunosIndspire AwardsAll LocalsBritish ColumbiaCalgaryEdmontonSaskatchewanSaskatoonManitobaThunder BaySudburyWindsorLondonKitchener-WaterlooHamiltonTorontoOttawaMontrealNew BrunswickPrince Edward IslandNova ScotiaNewfoundland & LabradorNorth My Local SettingsOttawa Changequickly access local content from your selected regionSelect a new default local region:British ColumbiaCalgaryEdmontonSaskatchewanSaskatoonManitobaThunder BaySudburyWindsorLondonKitchener-WaterlooHamiltonTorontoMontrealNew BrunswickPrince Edward IslandNova ScotiaNewfoundland & LabradorNorthNewsTop StoriesLocalThe NationalOpinionWorldCanadaPoliticsIndigenousBusinessHealthEntertainmentTech & ScienceCBC News InvestigatesGo PublicShowsSportsTop StoriesScoresNHLCommonwealth GamesOlympic SportsVideoPlayer's Own VoiceAll SportsRadioTop StoriesAll ShowsPodcastsSchedulesLISTEN LIVETVShowsScheduleWatch MoreDigital ArchivesShopSitemapHelpContactContestsnewsTop StoriesLocalThe NationalOpinionWorldCanadaPoliticsIndigenousBusinessHealthEntertainmentTech & ScienceCBC News InvestigatesGo PublicShowsTorontonewsOntario moves to tighten rules around real estate agents 'double-ending,' but won't ban the practiceNotificationsLearn more about the new look.Ontario moves to tighten rules around real estate agents 'double-ending,' but won't ban the practiceOntario is introducing regulatory changes to address “conflict of interest scenarios” involving real estate agents who represent both sides of a sale, but has stopped short of a ban on the controversial practice of “double-ending.” If legislation is passed, agents who break code of ethics would be subject to fines as high as $50KCBC News · Posted: Oct 05, 2017 7:33 PM ET | Last Updated: October 6, 2017Proposed changes would mean tighter rules for salespersons, brokers and brokerages representing more than one party in a real estate deal. (Graeme Roy/Canadian Press)Ontario is introducing regulatory changes to address "conflict of interest scenarios" involving real estate agents who represent both sides of a sale, but has stopped short of a ban on the controversial practice of "double-ending."The proposed changes, announced by the Minister of Government and Consumer Affairs Tracy MacCharles at Queen's Park on Thursday, would mean tighter rules for salespersons, brokers and brokerages representing more than one party in a real estate deal.Real estate practice of double-ending under scrutiny in OntarioThe legislation would also raise fines for people who violate the industry's code of ethics, from $25,000 up to $50,000 for individual salespersons and brokers, and up to $100,000 for brokerages.Response to concern raised by media"What we're doing is responding to what's been in the press a lot about multiple representation where you have one agent on the same transaction," MacCharles told reporters ThursdayThe changes would not ban double-ending, but would narrow the circumstances in which it would take place.?"Specific situations such as in rural Ontario where there might not be more than one agent, perhaps in a family situation … or perhaps in commercial or industrial situations where external real estate representation and expertise is essential," MacCharles said.However, the preference would still be that real estate deals follow what's known in the industry as the designated representation model, where buyer and seller each have their own agent.It would be largely up to the Real Estate Council of Ontario to take disciplinary action in cases where a real estate professional doesn't comply with the new rules, she said.Real estate agents caught breaking the rules on Marketplace's hidden cameraLast year, an undercover investigation by CBC's Marketplace revealed that several top agents in the Toronto area were breaking the rules by offering unfair advantages to potential clients in an effort to secure both ends of a deal.'A big step forward'The rule changes could include more up-front disclosures to consumers when double-ending occursBut exactly what teeth the regulator would have in terms of enforcement is yet to be worked out through consultation.Tim Hudak, CEO of the Ontario Real Estate Association, applauded the proposed legislation, calling it "a big step forward" and saying it's the strictest set of industry regulations anywhere in North America.It would be largely up to Real Estate Council of Ontario to take disciplinary action in cases where a real estate professional doesn't comply with the new rules (CBC)Asked if he felt double-ending should be made illegal, he responded: "It still allows consumers to say, 'I know you, you've helped me before, you're a good Realtor, I trust you.'"This is the biggest expenditure that the vast majority of us make in our lifetimeSo you want somebody that you know is going to give you the best advice, give you the best deal.… So you should always preserve choice."Toronto broker John Pasalis said he is largely in favour of the proposed changes, but that banning double-ending simply isn't practical within a real estate brokerage business.But Pasalis, CEO of Realosophy, points out that changing the maximum penalty does little to dissuade unethical Realtors, since he's not sure fines are taken seriously. "I think that's one of the tensions when you have an industry that sort of self-regulates," he saidThe board of directors at the Real Estate Council of Ontario consists almost entirely of brokers and agents."The default should be agents should be losing a good portion of the commissions that they've earned on those transactions if they've been found to have done something that's unethicalThe fines should be over and above that," he said.Otherwise, he said, the fine is just "the cost of doing business."For its part, the real estate council said it is pleased with the announcement and wants to see the province press for further restrictions on double-ending."The introduction of the bill is one step toward changes taking effect," the council said.A spokesperson for the council told CBC News the organization doesn't currently have the data or resources to enforce the changes if they become law.MacCharles has said she wants to give the regulator the ability to acquire that data.With files from Charlsie Agro and Havard GouldCBC's Journalistic Standards and PracticesReport Typo or Error|Send FeedbackRelated Stories Real estate agents caught breaking the rules on Marketplace's hidden camera Ontario proposes banning real estate agents from representing seller and buyer Realtors who break rules should face tougher penalties, Ontario association says MARKETPLACE: Real estate practice of 'double-ending' under scrutiny in OntarioPopular NowFind more popular storiesDiscover more from CBCMore stories from us{"@context":"http://schema.org/","@type":"WebPage","speakable":{"@type":"SpeakableSpecification","cssSelector":[".detailHeadline",".detailSummary"]}}Connect with CBCFacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramMobileRSSPodcastsNewslettersContact CBCAudience Relations, CBC P.OBox 500 Station A Toronto, ON Canada, M5W 1E6 Toll-free (Canada only): 1-866-306-4636TTY/Teletype writer: 1-866-220-6045Contact UsServices & InfoCorporate InfoPublic AppearancesCommercial ServicesReuse & PermissionTerms of UsePrivacy PolicyCBC ShopFAQJobsDoing Business with UsRenting FacilitiesIndependent ProducersOmbudsmanAccessibilityIt is a priority for CBC to create a website that is accessible to all Canadians including people with visual, hearing, motor and cognitive challenges.Closed Captioning and Described Video is available for many CBC-TV shows offered on CBC Watch.More about CBC AccessibilityAccessibility Feedback

Trending South Carolina News:


  • Conway, SC Homes For Sale & Real Estate
  • USC begins acquiring Bull Street land for new medical school
  • Pension-fund fees pit treasurer against senator
  • South Carolina GOP Contender Calls For More Members Of Congress To Be Armed
  • 2016 Brings Brighter Prospects for South Carolina Real Estate Agents
  • How a diverse band of locals won a SC county’s biggest environmental battle
  • Woman chained in container says captor bragged about killing
  • Lowcountry towns maintain pace among fastest-growing places in SC
  • More Lexington Square businesses to open September – December
  • Why Canadians are Investing in Real Estate Abroad
  • Parking space selling for $74,000 in downtown Charleston, SC
  • USC Athletic Director, Eric Hyman, resigns
  • Qatar to showcase economy and culture in South Carolina
  • Irmo-Seven Oaks, SC Real Estate: Newly Listed Homes for Sale
  • UPDATE 4-Rep. Scott to replace DeMint, will be only black in US Senate
  • Hyman Resigns Post as South Carolina A.D. to take job at Texas A&M
  • Interview With Survivor of Alleged Serial Killer: What We Learned
  • SC 25 Fastest Growing Companies Honored At Luncheon
  • Lowcountry deemed nation's top home-buying market
  • Former Chik-fil-A employee accused of robbing KFC