Find Real Estate Agents and Homes for Sale


Real Estate News --> Illinois News

Illinois Teachers Map Trail of Tears Route Through Their Own Backyard


Two Illinois high school teachers created an interactive curriculum ... stopped on their way west after being forced in the early 1830s from their ancestral homes in Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina, and Florida. The trail goes through Union ...


Archived Story

Stephen Sawchuk Follow news on the common core, literacy, math, STEM, social studies, the arts, and other curriculum and instruction topics with veteran Education Week reporter Stephen Sawchuk 74822 74822 « Judge Blocks Arizona From Banning Ethnic Studies Classes | Main | Teacher Fired Over Art History Flap Involving Nude Paintings » Illinois Teachers Map Trail of Tears Route Through Their Own Backyard By Brenda Iasevoli on December 29, 2017 3:19 PM Two Illinois high school teachers created an interactive curriculum that traces the Trail of Tears through southern parts of their state. Stacie Tefft, one of the curriculum's creators, stressed the power of immersing kids in local history, an approach educators call "place-based education." "For a lot of our kids, we give them a history book, and they're like whatever," Tefft told the Southern Illinoisan"This ..it's a lot of our kids' backyard." The curriculum centers around a Geographic Information System (GIS) map that the teachers createdAlong the trail are outlines of campfires to indicate the sites where Cherokee people stopped on their way west after being forced in the early 1830s from their ancestral homes in Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina, and FloridaThe trail goes through Union, Johnson, and Pope counties in southern Illinois. Students read the map along with journal entries, spanning May 19, 1838 through April 1, 1839, by Daniel SButrick, a minister who traveled with the Cherokee across the southern Illinois routeThe curriculum asks students to draw conclusions based on their readings of the documentsHere is an example: Based on the map locating campsites and Butrick's journal entries about campsites, what is the strongest claim that can be supported with evidence? aThere are fewer campsite locations in Pope County due to the lack of resources. bThere are fewer campsite locations in Pope County due to the lack of rivers. cThere are more campsite locations in Union County due to the proximity of the Mississippi River. dThere are more campsite locations in Union County because the Cherokee were treated better there than in Pope County. All the teaching resources are available for free hereThe teachers created the curriculum, which was funded by the Library of Congress, as part of their master's work at Southern Illinois University. Grant Miller, an associate professor of curriculum and instruction at Southern Illinois University, praised the Trail of Tears lessons for providing students with an authentic experience, and not relying on memorization of facts"What's so exciting about this is this really gets into the kinds of literacy skills that we're asking history teachers to be teaching with their students, as far as analyzing primary sources, comparing those primary sources to maps, as you have here," Miller told the Southern Illinoisan. Related stories: Genius Loci: Place-Based Education & Why It Matters Primary Sources Breathe Life Into Civil War Digitized Historical Documents Give Students Direct Access to the Past Categories: Curriculum Instructional Materials Social Studies/History/Civics Tags: Cherokee Daniel SButrick Illinois Illinois Chapter of the Trail of Tears place-based education place-based learning Southern Illinois University Trail of Tears Notice: We recently upgraded our comments(Learn more here.) If you are logged in as a subscriber or registered user and already have a Display Name on edweek.org, you can post commentsIf you do not already have a Display Name, please create one here. var disqus_config = function () { this.page.url = "http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2017/12/illinois_teachers_map_trail_of.html"; this.page.title = "Illinois Teachers Map Trail of Tears Route Through Their Own Backyard - Curriculum Matters - Education Week"; this.page.identifier = "ewblog_74822"; this.page.remote_auth_s3 = "eyJpZCI6bnVsbCwidXNlcm5hbWUiOm51bGwsImVtYWlsIjpudWxsfQ== a7e4771a97ce849d24a62441cab86eff1523cd89 1515042282"; this.page.api_key = "1T1g9tkYnTbjB3a6j8NOZNFx09OWL42l4OXHXDYzQwv4TtvCuUrCxy4B6DYG8JXV"; this.sso = { name: "EdWeek Login", button: "https://www.edweek.org/images/comment_login.png", icon: "https://www.edweek.org/images/site-icons/ew-favicon.ico", url: "https://www.edweek.org/login/index2.php", logout: "https://www.edweek.org/logout.html", width:"500", height:"450" }; }; /* * Load Disqus script with the appropriate src property value from global.cfg * */ (function() { var d = document, s = d.createElement('script'); s.src = "//education-week.disqus.com/embed.js"; s.setAttribute('data-timestamp', +new Date()); (d.head || d.body).appendChild(s); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. Ground Rules for Posting We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of othersProfanity and personal attacks are prohibitedBy commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement. All comments are public. $j(document).ready(function(){

Trending Illinois News:


  • Sudden fall: Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock is resigning
  • Absolute Auction Former Altorfer Caterpillar Commercial Property
  • Illinois Senate approves $5.4B tax increase
  • It’s Your Business
  • Wheaton, IL Real Estate: Foreclosures
  • 7 Ways To Know Whether To Remodel Your Home Or Sell It
  • Church cuts sizable check to each parishioner – no strings attached
  • Grant to help Quincy seniors remain in homes; alderman questions truck purchase
  • NEW BOOK – Illinois Commercial Real Estate – Due Diligence to Closing
  • The Latest: Homes evacuated due to explosion risk at plant
  • As Nursing Homes Evict Patients, States Question Motives
  • Report: Thousands would die if monster quake hit Southern Illinois
  • States Acting to Protect Buyers of Seller-Financed Homes
  • $111M Partnership to Develop Major Mixed-Use Project in Chicago
  • 100-year-old local veteran receives special birthday gift
  • Harmony Health Plan Provides Micro-Grants to Community-Based Organizations that Support Social Services in Illinois
  • Judge rules 'Barrel Head' name, logo belong to bank, not Amber Jack owners
  • M/I Homes Announces Redemption of All Outstanding Depositary Shares Representing Series A Preferred Shares
  • Broker says he is owed fees on sale of ranch by Helmville
  • AARP Illinois Urges Gov. Rauner To Sign Senior Care Protection Bill