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North Texas community planned to help adults with autism


The first students accepted to the 29 Acres transitional program will live in two houses in nearby Paloma Creek that were purchased by an unnamed North Texas family that has a daughter with autism. They are leasing the homes to 29 Acres for a significantly ...


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Updated 12:26 pm, Monday, February 5, 2018 27, 2018, shows Ingrid Basson lending a helping hand to her 17 year-old son Sam who asked for help while constructing a Batmobile from Legos at their Dallas homeThe Bassons moved here from the Chicago area six months ago after reading about the 29 Acres program planned in Cross Roads, TexasSam who is on the autism spectrum will someday live at the Denton County development which focuses on housing and employment opportunities for adults with autism(Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News) Photo: Tom Fox, AP / The Dallas Morning News" class="landscape" /> 27, 2018, shows Ingrid Basson lending a helping hand to her 17 year-old son Sam who asked for help while constructing a Batmobile from Legos at their Dallas homeThe Bassons moved here from the Chicago area six months ago after reading about the 29 Acres program planned in Cross Roads, TexasSam who is on the autism spectrum will someday live at the Denton County development which focuses on housing and employment opportunities for adults with autism(Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News)"> Photo: Tom Fox, AP Image 1of/1 CaptionClose Image 1 of 1 This photo taken Jan27, 2018, shows Ingrid Basson lending a helping hand to her 17 year-old son Sam who asked for help while constructing a Batmobile from Legos at their Dallas homeThe Bassons moved here from the Chicago area six months ago after reading about the 29 Acres program planned in Cross Roads, TexasSam who is on the autism spectrum will someday live at the Denton County development which focuses on housing and employment opportunities for adults with autism(Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News) less This photo taken Jan27, 2018, shows Ingrid Basson lending a helping hand to her 17 year-old son Sam who asked for help while constructing a Batmobile from Legos at their Dallas homeThe Bassons moved here ..more Photo: Tom Fox, AP /**/ North Texas community planned to help adults with autism 1 / 1 Back to Gallery /**/ DALLAS (AP) — The first part of a $12 million project in Denton County that's aimed at creating job and housing opportunities for adults with autism officially launches this year. The Dallas Morning News reports starting in mid-February, adults 18 and older who have a primary diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and who have completed high school can apply for placement in the 29 Acres Transition Academy, the founders say. The two-year transition program will help young people with autism learn to live independently, and offer specialized job training and employment assistance. Residents will be selected on a first-come, first-served basis as they meet the criteriaTraining will begin in August for the eight who are accepted. It's just one part of a project that was first reported by The Dallas Morning News last year. A University Park couple, Clay Heighten and Debra Caudy, announced plans to create a long-term solution for people like their 20-year old son, Jon, who has a diagnosis of autism and lives at home. The couple started a nonprofit and made a $750,000 personal investment in 29 acres of land in the town of Cross Roads, where they plan to build a community with duplexes, an activity center and educational programs meant to teach higher-functioning young adults to become more self-sufficient. "Our vision is becoming a realityIt just really speaks to the need," said Caudy, who is in her 60s and worried about what will happen to Jon when she and Clay are no longer around. Autism is a group of developmental disorders usually diagnosed in childhood that fall on a wide-ranging spectrum; some children have only mild symptomsOthers are severely disabledOften individuals with the condition have difficulty communicatingSome exhibit repetitive behaviors. News about the 29 Acres effort last year refueled a national conversation about the need to prepare for an estimated half million teenagers with autism expected to reach adulthood over the next decade. "The big picture here is that there are not nearly enough services," said Dave Kearon, director of adult services at Autism SpeaksThat department was created in 2012; the national focus had traditionally centered around early interventions and treatments to manage symptoms. So far 20 families who are also worried about a lack of available resources for their own children have put up a total of $1.6 million combined to propel the North Texas project forward. One such benefactor is Mitch Basson, 62, of DallasHis 17-year-old son, Sam, struggles to make sense of social cues, like body language and jokes. He may not understand if someone rolls their eyes, and phrases like "I'm pulling your leg," he takes literally. "And all I wish is what any other parent wants for their kids; to reach their maximum potential, whatever that may be, and to be happy, safe and healthyAnd that's what led me to 29 Acres," he said. That sentiment was shared by Frisco couple Doug and Jodi Bartek, who are both in their 60s. Their 21-year old son Ryan has a more extreme form of autismRyan has what's described as perfect pitch — by listening to a note on a piano, he can identify which note was played and in which keyBut, he likes to do that over and over and over again, and he has difficulty communicating with others. The Barteks say they started looking when Ryan was in his teens for a place where he could eventually live. "We found really good programs for special-needs young adults in general," Doug said"But we really wanted some place that was specialized in autism." After reading about 29 Acres last year in The Dallas Morning News, both couples say they reached out to the founders and committed $80,000 each to invest in making the community a reality. Groundbreaking on the 29 Acres property in Cross Roads is anticipated in late spring. The founders are modeling their project after similar transitional living places in Arizona and CaliforniaBut parents across the country have been getting creative, pooling resources and proactively filling the unmet need for housing, job training and social activities, experts said. Most adults on the spectrum live with their parentsAnd as those parents grow into their 70s, they become less able to care for their adult children"That's when the real crisis hits," Kearon noted. The first students accepted to the 29 Acres transitional program will live in two houses in nearby Paloma Creek that were purchased by an unnamed North Texas family that has a daughter with autismThey are leasing the homes to 29 Acres for a significantly reduced price. "That helps us keep expenses lowBut just as important gives us stability," Caudy said. ___ Information from: The Dallas Morning News, http://www.dallasnews.com This is an AP Member Exchange shared by The Dallas Morning News window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: 'thumbnails-a', container: 'taboola-below-article-thumbnails', placement: 'Below Article Thumbnails', target_type: 'mix' }); /**/ /**/ // Init and/or maintain instance count current instance count (should end up being 1 or 2) var taboolaRightRailInstance = taboolaRightRailInstance || 0; taboolaRightRailInstance++; // Desktop breakpoints (initial load) should render the widget at only the first intance in the HTML // Mobile breakpoints (initial load) should render the widget at only the second instance in the HTML var width = $(window).width(); if ( (width >= 768 && taboolaRightRailInstance === 1) || (width Most Popular 1 Wednesday forecasts showing snow, sleet and rain for Connecticut 2 Neighborhood grocer may be in store for Four Corners area of... 3 Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton appears in Super Bowl ad 4 All she has to do to collect a $560 million lotto jackpot is... 5 Barrister’s Coffee House opens in downtown Danbury 6 Danbury resists fired officer’s demand for reinstatement Abandoned motorboat in state forest remains mystery /**/ /**/ View Comments

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