Find Real Estate Agents and Homes for Sale


Real Estate News --> Kentucky News

Is the sun setting on solar energy in Kentucky? Lawmakers take their first vote.


But we seem to be comfortable doing so.” There are 2,177 solar-powered homes in Kentucky, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association. Only 0.05 percent of the state’s electricity comes from the sun, the group says.


Archived Story

Solar panels on the roof of one of five houses built in Whitley County to demonstrate design and building standards aimed at cutting heating and cooling costs by 90 percent on May 24, 2012 Bill Estep bestep@herald-leader.com Solar panels on the roof of one of five houses built in Whitley County to demonstrate design and building standards aimed at cutting heating and cooling costs by 90 percent on May 24, 2012 Bill Estep bestep@herald-leader.com jQuery(document).ready(function () { mi.leadAssets.init(); }); Politics & Government Is the sun setting on solar energy in Kentucky? Lawmakers take their first vote. By John Cheves jcheves@herald-leader.com LinkedIn Google+ Pinterest Reddit Print Order Reprint of this Story $(document).ready(function () { mi.articleShareTools.init({ nextLinkedin: '10267', nextPinterest: '10221' }); mi.socialSharingScroll.init(); }); February 08, 2018 01:06 PM Frankfort A controversial bill that would make it less financially attractive to install solar energy panels in Kentucky is going to the full House after it overwhelmingly was approved Thursday by the House Natural Resources Committee. House Bill 227 would dramatically roll back the reimbursements paid to future homeowners with solar panels on their roofs when they sell surplus energy to utility companies, a practice known as “net metering.” Instead of getting the retail rate, homeowners would get the much lower wholesale rate. Solar panel installers say the smaller payments could mean that homeowners would need 20 years to recoup the cost of putting panels on their roofs — an average of $20,000 — instead of the current nine years. “This bill is essentially killing residential solar energy and allowing the utility companies to maintain a monopoly,” Jamie Clark of Synergy Home in Lexington said after Thursday’s committee vote. jQuery(document).ready(function () { mi.renderNewsletterIframe.init({ container: '#newsletter-signUpWidget', url: 'http://x.email.kentucky.com/ats/url.aspx?cr=663&wu=186,http://x.email.kentucky.com/ats/url.aspx?cr=663&wu=190,http://x.email.kentucky.com/ats/url.aspx?cr=663&wu=196' }); }); Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW jQuery(document).ready(function () { mi.calltoActionCtrl.init(); }); “I’ve said many times, if Time Warner Cable could go back 30 years and make it illegal to put a satellite dish on your roof, that would be their business modelThat’s effectively what this bill is doing for the utilities,” Clark said. However, committee chairman Jim Gooch, R-Providence, the sponsor of the bill, said the current payment model is unfair because it forces utility companies to pay homeowners three times as much as their excess electricity is worth. Utilities have fixed costs included in their retail energy prices, such as employees, infrastructure and debt service, Gooch saidBut a homeowner with solar panels does not have those costs and does not need to be reimbursed at that high a rate, he said. Kentuckians already participating in net metering would see no changes for 25 years under the bill, Gooch saidFor future participants, the new rules would take effect in July. The state’s major utilities, including Kentucky Utilities and Louisville Gas & Electric, have endorsed Gooch’s bill. The committee heard testimony on the bill Jan31, but Gooch did not allow a vote until Thursday, after he had added three new members to the committee with the permission of House Republican leadersWhile opponents of the bill protested that move, the vote was not close: Fourteen members voted to send the bill to the full House, four voted against it and four abstained. Several Republican lawmakers who voted for the bill in committee said they have concerns with it and pledged to amend it on the House floor to make it fairer to homeowners with solar panels. “I think this bill gives too big of a haircut to the solar companies and to the solar userBut I think its intentions are correct in trying to correct some of the fixed costs that are not being covered right now,” said state RepJim DuPlessis, R-Elizabethtown. Voting against the bill, state RepKelly Flood, D-Lexington, said her House colleagues should be embarrassed about “bringing a sledgehammer” against the nascent solar energy industry, which is creating hundreds of middle-class jobs across KentuckyAnd state RepReginald Meeks, D-Louisville, said lawmakers should be embracing renewable energy. “Solar is going to be part of the future,” Meeks said“We can’t live in the pastBut we seem to be comfortable doing so.” There are 2,177 solar-powered homes in Kentucky, according to the Solar Energy Industries AssociationOnly 0.05 percent of the state’s electricity comes from the sun, the group says. John Cheves: 859-231-3266, @BGPolitics Solar panels Getty Images/iStockphoto lazyLoadingModule("inlinegallery-template-199091279", "inlinegallery-target-199091279", "gallery",500, undefined, undefined, undefined, "undefined", 199091279 , 1 ); Suggested for you lazyLoadingModule("zerg-template", "zerg-target", "zerg",500, undefined, undefined, undefined, "53301", undefined , undefined );   Comments   Needs to be visible to set the correct height of the comment componentI'm hiding it on document readyAppending it later did not work--> jQuery(document).ready(function () { mi.commentingFaceboook.init(); }); Videos View More Video Politics & Government Wyoming secretary of state resigns amid misconduct claims US stocks swing back to gains, Dow up 330 on turbulent day When will it stop? Conservatives who vowed to cut spending keep spending This van was supposed to help end panhandling in LexingtonIs it working? Here’s what’s blocking senators from reaching a DACA deal Politics & Government jQuery(document).ready(function () { UD.updateDate.getDiffDate("1518118246", "MMMM DD, YYYY hh:mm A", "America/New_York", "en" , "-05:00"); }); Subscriptions Start a Subscription Customer Service eEdition Vacation Hold Pay Your Bill Rewards Site Information About Us Contact Us Newsletters News in Education Archives Social, Mobile & More Text News Alerts Mobile & Apps Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ Advertising Contact Us Place a Classified Ad Local Deals Shopping Digital Solutions Media Kit More

Trending Kentucky News:


  • Here are the most expensive Jefferson County homes sold in January
  • They were Kentucky’s poorest, most desperate people. And he was a Kennedy with an entourage.
  • Kentucky mental health agency spends big on executive pay and political lobbying
  • Kentucky Principle Confesses to Stealing His Students’ Nude Pictures
  • Kentucky Teachers’ Pension Gains 15.37%
  • Kentucky couple watches their Gatlinburg cabins burn down
  • Former Kentucky pastor picking up pieces of Texas church
  • Bank of Henderson changing identity
  • Retail is vibrant in Louisville, says Commercial Kentucky
  • Welcome to Eclipseville, Kentucky: Solar eclipse enthusiasts descend upon tiny town of Hopkinsville
  • New coalition to tackle Kentucky’s ‘smoking crisis’
  • Q and A: Kentucky Speedway trying to put focus back on racing
  • Intimidation or accountability? A mining company goes after Kentucky regulators' own money
  • Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency of the Bluegrass again accepting holiday gifts for elderly
  • Kentucky's January jobless figures down from a year ago
  • 2 from Paducah, KY facing prostitution charges
  • Country roads take me to Kentucky
  • Aerial ride to view damage of eastern Kentucky wildfires
  • Kentucky housing market bounces back in October after September slump, follows national trend
  • Captain D's finds a home in 'My Ol' Kentucky Home'