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Immigrants Say Working at Kansas Ranch Was 'Like Slavery'


Immigrants working on a remote Kansas ranch toil in type of servitude to pay back their ... give pay advances to workers who have no credit so they could buy vehicles or homes.


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Advertisement Supported by U.S. Immigrants Say Working at Kansas Ranch Was 'Like Slavery' By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSMARCH 7, 2018, 2:22 P.ME.S.T. Continue reading the main story Share This Page Continue reading the main story if ( window.magnum && window.magnum.getFlags().indexOf('headlineBalancer') > 0 && window.magnum.headlineBalancer && window.magnum.headlineBalancer.initialize && window.magnum.headlineBalancer.shouldRun() ) { window.magnum.headlineBalancer.initialize(); } SYRACUSE, Kan— Immigrants working on a remote Kansas ranch toil in type of servitude to pay back their employer for the cost of smuggling them into the country.That's according to five people who worked at Fuller Cattle CoOne former worker shared a pay stub with The Associated Press showing that he took home a little over $200 for two weeks of nearly constant work, or just over $1 an hourThe company deducted a $1,300 cash advance repayment.Rachel Tovar is another worker who spoke to the APShe says the company's practices were "like slavery."A company attorney says the allegations are simply not trueHe says company policy was to give pay advances to workers who have no credit so they could buy vehicles or homes Continue reading the main story We’re interested in your feedback on this pageTell us what you think. What's Next Loading... Go to Home Page » Site Index The New York Times window.magnum.writeLogo('small', 'https://g1.nyt.com/assets/article/20180305-173758/images/foundation/logos/', ', ', 'standard', 'site-index-branding-link', '); Site Index Navigation News World U.S. Politics N.Y. Business Tech Science Health Sports Education Obituaries Today's Paper

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